The Red Sox are apparently still tweaking the language in J.D. Martinez’s contract and are not worried about the slugger’s current physical condition.

Since news broke last week that the two sides had reached a five-year deal worth $110 million, rumors have swirled that Martinez’s physical uncovered a problem. Those fears heightened Friday when NBC Sports Boston reported the Red Sox and Martinez had agreed to consult “additional medical experts.”

Here’s the thing: They shouldn’t be necessary.

If pitchers and catchers could communicate with each other with actual words, with headsets or earpieces, the trips to the mound wouldn’t be necessary. Opposing teams can’t steal signs if there aren’t signs to steal. And if there are no signs to steal, there’s no need to be worried about stolen signs and far fewer reasons for time-consuming mound visits.

The complaint comes a month after the MLBPA hinted their frustrations to the league. However, MLB said, “We do not have concerns about the Pirates’ and Marlins’ compliance with the Basic Agreement provisions regarding the use of revenue sharing proceeds.”

Teams are required to use the revenue-sharing money to improve the on-field product but not necessarily on their major-league payroll, according to the collective bargaining agreement.

MLB acknowledge the grievance, which was filed Friday, in a statement to the Times adding they “believe it has no merit.”

The Pirates responded in a statement Tuesday from president Frank Coonelly calling the complaint “baseless” and a “meritless claim.”

“As previously indicated, our revenue sharing receipts have decreased for seven consecutive seasons while our Major League payroll has more than doubled over this same period. Our revenue sharing receipts are now just a fraction of what we spend our major League payroll,” the statement read.buccaneers_031